Running Hudson on My Book Live

The Western Digital My Book Live is a product that is optimized to do one thing: serve files.  And for that, I love it.  What it does, it does fairly well.  The setup is super easy too.  The best $150 I’ve spent on computer hardware in a long time.

When I realized the device was actually a simplified Linux server, I had to see if Hudson would run on My Book Live.  If Hudson ran well, I reasoned, I’d be able to use it as my build machine.  If not, then that’s O.K. too.  At least I found out.

So, I installed Hudson using apt-get, just like you would on a regular Linux server.

I even got the web page to come up:

Although My Book Live will run Hudson, the scaled down Linux server is best at serving up files.  Not much else.

Although My Book Live will run Hudson, the scaled down Linux server should be relegated to what it does best: serve up files.

That’s pretty cool.  The app ran, not surprisingly, very slow.  Apparently, running Hudson or any other Linux application not  installed on My Book Live at the factory runs the risk of interrupting your backup experience.  After all, the device is built just right for serving up files and its simple web interface. And for that Western Digital gets 10 awesomeness points.

And at that – it does it’s task very well.

Now if only Western Digital made a beefier machine – even if they just added 16GB of memory to the drive.  That would open up all kinds of possibilities for the My Book product line.

My Book Live : the $150 Linux Server ??

So, I perused the Western Digital community forum for information about my new My Book Live device that I just installed, and I noticed that some people were talking about enabling SSH logins:

Steps to enable SSH

So, naturally I got curious. Could I enable that, log in and look around.  I suspected Linux was under the hood.  So I did.  You have to log in as Root, and the password you need at first is right on the screen:

http://(YOUR.LIVEBOOK.ADDRESS)/UI/ssh

I was right about the device running on Linux. After logging in, I noticed I had a very current Linux Build on a Power PC processor:

# uname -a
Linux MyBookLive.local 2.6.32.11-svn70860 #1 Thu May 17 13:32:51 PDT 2012 ppc GNU/Linux

The first thing I did, of course was change the root password.  I’m sure if you forget your password you will need to perform a factory reset.  That might be bad so don’t loose that.  I did notice that the only user account that seems to be allowed to log in is root.  Here’s some additional specs:

top - 22:57:44 up 4:05, 1 user, load average: 4.86, 4.28, 3.53
Tasks: 100 total, 1 running, 99 sleeping, 0 stopped, 0 zombie
Cpu(s): 1.7%us, 53.8%sy, 23.8%ni, 0.0%id, 3.6%wa, 2.0%hi, 15.2%si, 0.0%st
Mem: 253632k total, 250944k used, 2688k free, 10816k buffers
Swap: 500608k total, 64768k used, 435840k free, 97728k cached

Not bad.  And, of course, Internet ports that are being listened to:

# netstat -an | head -n2 & netstat -an | grep LISTEN
[1] 6171
Active Internet connections (servers and established)
Proto Recv-Q Send-Q Local Address Foreign Address State 
tcp 0 0 0.0.0.0:49152 0.0.0.0:* LISTEN 
tcp 0 0 0.0.0.0:2049 0.0.0.0:* LISTEN 
tcp 0 0 0.0.0.0:548 0.0.0.0:* LISTEN 
tcp 0 0 0.0.0.0:12548 0.0.0.0:* LISTEN 
tcp 0 0 0.0.0.0:3689 0.0.0.0:* LISTEN 
tcp 0 0 0.0.0.0:139 0.0.0.0:* LISTEN 
tcp 0 0 0.0.0.0:111 0.0.0.0:* LISTEN 
tcp 0 0 0.0.0.0:22 0.0.0.0:* LISTEN 
tcp 0 0 0.0.0.0:59607 0.0.0.0:* LISTEN 
tcp 0 0 0.0.0.0:46647 0.0.0.0:* LISTEN 
tcp 0 0 0.0.0.0:38234 0.0.0.0:* LISTEN 
tcp 0 0 0.0.0.0:445 0.0.0.0:* LISTEN 
tcp6 0 0 :::3689 :::* LISTEN 
tcp6 0 0 :::139 :::* LISTEN 
tcp6 0 0 :::80 :::* LISTEN 
tcp6 0 0 :::22 :::* LISTEN 
tcp6 0 0 :::443 :::* LISTEN 
tcp6 0 0 ::1:4700 :::* LISTEN 
tcp6 0 0 :::445 :::* LISTEN

So, depending on what this machine is able to do, it may be possible to use it as a simple server for routine tasks.  More later as I find out what this box can do …