Patent Announcement: Segment Based Cellular Network Performance Monitoring

An approach to monitoring cellular networks by specific segments.

I’m happy to be able to finally share a patent of mine that is in process:

Mechanism for facilitating dynamic and segment-based monitoring of cellular network performance in an on-demand services environment

As always feel free to comment and ask questions.

“Use the (Sales)force, Richard …”

For those of you who don’t already know, I have an announcement.  On Monday, July 18, 2011, I officially started my new job at Salesforce.com.  I’m working in Salesforce’s mobile containers group.  And, I’m totally stoked.

One of the reasons I only have to post to my professional blog every so often is simply because on the day-to-day I’m already making an impact on mobile software products you see in the market.  The marketing departments of the companies I work for have the job of talking about the work, and they do a great job.  You can actually see my work in a lot of places already.  It’s just released under brands like Cloudtix, Amazon, Photobucket, and now Salesforce.

Some projects I can talk about, and others not.  But I assure you I’m out there, out in the wild, burning my soul into some pretty national products you most likely are already be using.  As I get permission to talk about those projects, which often have a shroud of secrecy that would make the U.S. National Security Agency envious, I’ll blog about them here when I can.  If it makes sense to use some other forum to talk about it, like through a corporate blog, I’ll at least post the link.

Salesforce will give me the opportunity to continue my tradition of working on great products.  And work on them in so many great ways I can’t even talk about it. Not just because it’s Salesforce (and not me) that will decide what information about my projects goes public or not (those decisions are above my paygrade). I just flat out get too excited to put the projects into words sometimes.

Did I mention how stoked I am about the whole transition? Oh, yeah I guess I did….

Computerworld: Salesforce Among Top 10 IT Employeers In 2011

On Monday, July 18, 2011, Computerworld announced a ranking of the top IT companies to work for.  Salesforce was among the top ten … for the second year in a row:

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/computerworld-survey-ranks-salesforcecom-among-top-10-places-to-work-in-it-for-second-year-in-a-row-2011-07-18

Here’s a link to the original article:

http://www.computerworld.com/spring/bp/2011/1

Here’s the top 10:

Android apps running on RIM’s Playbook?

The RIM press release says it all … that developers will be able to repackage and resign existing Android apps to run on PlayBook.

Yeah … That’s what the developer community needs … more undocumented RIM SDKs to add to the existing, poorly documented and cumbersome family of RIM development SDKs!

The cost of writing mobile apps for RIM devices is already about (I estimate) 30% higher than any other device just due to the challenges of dealing with the RIM SDKs and hardware.

Is adding another build step really going to help?

You Have To Hand it To Curt

Curt Schilling’s latest venture is big news this month.  I didn’t know he started Studio 38 until this morning when I read the article about him in Biz Tech Magazine (September 2008).

38 Studios

(click)

See also Curt’s Blog on 38 Studios.

I can’t resist not putting a link to Curt Schilling’s blog on my own blog anymore.  O.K., we do share the same surname, and I get asked a lot if I’m a relation just because of the way I look, and  I have a fascination with baseball that goes back Earl Averill, who is from my neck of the woods (Snohomish, WA).

But it’s not that.  It’s simply because Curt decided to get into the technology side of things by creating 38 Studios.  And from a technology standpoint, he chose a really great and promising technology at that.  Sometimes ordinary people do extraordinary things, and then use their success to do more extraordinary things.

So I am compelled to write.  The fact that Curt chose to get into gaming which is simultaneously rooted in science, math, artificial intelligence and art is big news to me.  Gaming combines the latest in simulation technologies and artificial intelligence with artistic expression to immerse the player into a new experience.  If you have a gaming company with that kind of talent, it can be used to make gobs of money in gaming and do great research for serious science projects at the same time.  The two efforts are inextricably linked.  The more advanced the science, the better the game, and vice-versa.  The potential for the staff at 38 Studios to add to the important discipline of artificial intelligence either now or in the future, alone, is exciting to me.  And I wouldn’t be a bit surprised if Curt encouraged his staff members to present at an AAAI Conference.

Not to embarrass him, but Curt’s obviously got a lot of drive to do something bigger than himself, and that takes character.  See, he’s not content after a very successful baseball career to merely “take his toys out of the sandbox and go home.”  He’s putting his energy into gaming – which, from my perspective as an artificial intelligence researcher and computer scientist, is something much bigger than himself.  It’s like going to the moon and “doing the hard things”, as JFK said at 8 minutes and 23 seconds into his speech, just because it’s there.

Well, all that aside, I’m going to enjoy the “World Domination Through Gaming” experience out of Studio 38.  My MBA spidey sense tells me he’s onto something very promising.

Just a couple suggestions for the office, Curt: onsite daycare for your employees’ children with lots of toys; lots of simple creature comforts like beer in the fridge and beef jerkey for the employees; a special creative workshop where all the employees can bring in their favorite hobbies and art to work on; and of course a nice yard to throw the ball around once in a while.

Keeps the creativity and morale up for all those big thinkers you have to hire.

Looking for some old code and computers…

I’m always on the lookout for retired source code, and old mid-range computers.  If you know of any, drop me a comment on this post and we’ll talk.

No system, small or large, should be ignored.  If it was in production once before, then it’s something I’m interested in seeing.  Especially if it was used prior to 1995 and was built to process a lot of data at once.

Anything written in the following languages will do:

  • COBOL
  • Cognos Powerhouse
  • MUMPS
  • Q-BASIC/MS-BASIC
  • C/C++
  • SmallTalk
  • Coldfusion
  • LISP – which includes Autocad scripts
  • Prolog
  • Turbo Pascal
  • Assembler
  • VAX VMS command scripts
  • MODULA/MODULA-2
  • Ada
  • PERL
  • Applications written for CORBA (any language).